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HTML Tutorial
Frequently Asked Questions
Revised March 10, 2005 - 12 Q&As so far.




Questions Index (Click the Question)
  1. Why doesn't my title show up when I click "check it out"?
  2. I tried the EMBED tag in Internet Explorer but it didn't work. How do I put sounds for older versions of Internet Explorer?
  3. At the end of your tutorial you have a comment form... why don't you explain how to use forms/surveys in your tutorial?
  4. Your tutorial has taught me to understand HTML better than all of the HTML books I have bought... why have you kept this a free service?
  5. What topics do you plan to add over the next few months? Java? ActiveX?
  6. I think the interactive part is awesome, but I don't like to stick to the examples you give. Can I use any HTML in the box?
  7. How do I keep people from stealing my source code and/or images?
  8. When I try to upload my site, all my images are X's. How do I get them to load correctly?
  9. How do I make a thumbnail for my image(s)?
  10. How do I prevent an underline from appearing under a link?
  11. How do I open a link into a new window?
  12. How do I use HTML on Myspace to modify my profile, blog, etc?
1. Q: Why doesn't my title show up when I click "check it out"?

A: You're probably looking at the wrong part of the screen. The Title usually shows up in the Title Bar on the Window, to the left of the minimize/maximize buttons on graphical browsers.

2. Q: I tried the EMBED tag in Internet Explorer but it didn't work. How do I put sounds for older versions of Internet Explorer?

A: For older versions of Internet Explorer, this technique was used <BG SOUND="sound.ext">. I do not, however, recommend its use.

3. Q: At the end of your tutorial you have a comment form... why don't you explain how to use CGI forms/surveys in your tutorial?

A: Use of most forms requires knowledge of CGI programming, and a server capable of running CGI scripts, which would be extremely too long to document in this tutorial. If you already know your server is capable of CGI scripts, check their help section for pre-made scripts (just cut and paste). There is also a decent basic CGI tutorial online, at cgi101.com.

4. Q: Your tutorial has taught me to understand HTML better than all of the HTML books I have bought... why have you kept this a free service?

A: I am one of those people on the Internet who believes that the web should be free information to some extent. But if you'd like to send me a thank you postcard or letter here is the mailing address:

Dave Kristula
P.O. Box 13335
Reading, PA  19612
USA

Also, you can help out by visiting the sponsor banners, sending us a few dollars via Amazon HS or Paypal for server upkeep, and by telling your friends with this form.

5. Q: What topics do you plan to add over the next few months? Java?

A: I have just completed CSS: An Interactive Tutorial for Beginners, which covers virtually every aspect of cascading style sheets recommendation 1. I am working on a JavaScript Guide.

6. Q: I think the interactive part is awesome, but I don't like to stick to the examples you give. Can I use any HTML in the box?

A: Yes. Any HTML tag that your browser supports will work in the box. So you can carry tags from chapters to chapters and mix and match... use your imagination! Be creative!

7. Q: How do I keep people from stealing my source code and/or images?

A: Because copies of your HTML files and images are stored in cache, it is impossible to prevent someone from being able to save them onto their hard drive. If you are concerned about your images, you may wish to embed a watermark with your information into the image. Consult your image editing program's help file for more details.

8. Q: When I try to upload my site, all my images are X's. How do I get them to load correctly?

A: They are a few reasons that this could happen. The most common are:

  1. You're attempting to use a .bmp or .tif or other non-supported file format. You can only use .gif and .jpg on the web. You must convert files that are not .gif or .jpg into a .gif or .jpg with your image/graphics program.
  2. You've forgotten to upload the graphic files. Double-Check.
  3. You've incorrectly linked to the images. When you are starting out, try just using the file name in the <img> tag. If you have cat.jpg, use <img src="cat.jpg">.
  4. Image file names are case-sensitive. If your file is called CaT.JpG, you cannot type cat.jpg, you must type CaT.JpG exactly in the src.
  5. If all of the above fail, re-upload the image in BINARY mode. You may have accidentally uploaded the image in ASCII mode.
9. Q: How do I make a thumbnail for my image(s)?

A: Thumbnails are very useful, but they take a little bit of time to make. All you need is a graphics editing program that has functions to resize an image (sometimes it's under a function called image attributes). Be advised--when you have made a thumbnail, you will need to save it as something different than the original. Also, you will generally want to link to the larger graphic when you are done.

Here are the steps:

  1. Load a copy of the image into your graphics editing program.
  2. Determine the ratio the thumbnail to be. (Do you want it to be half the size? One third of the size? One quarter of the size? One tenth of the size?)
  3. Find the resize (or change attributes) function of your program. Most programs will recogize a percentage, for example you can type in 25% for height and width if you want the thumbnail to be a quarter of the size. (It it doesn't do percentages, you can calculate it by multiplying the pixels by the percentage. If you have a graphic that is 400 by 100, and you want it 25% of the size, multiple each measurement by .25. In this case, you'll get 100 and 25.)
  4. Once you are satisfied with the thumbnail, think of a name for the image. Choose Save As and enter that name. (Tip: I like to just add t after the image name. For taco.jpg I'd use tacot.jpg)
  5. Upload the image to your site, and edit your HTML to load the new image name with the new, smaller size. If you wish, you can link to the larger image around the image.

    Example: You have taco.jpg which is 400 pixels wide and 100 pixels high. You made a thumbnail of it called tacot.jpg, which is now 100 pixels wide and 25 pixels high. After you have both images uploaded, here's the code:

    <a href="taco.jpg"><img src="tacot.jpg" width=100 height=25 border=0 alt="click for larger taco"></a>

You'll find border=0 to be helpful in eliminating a link-colored box around your thumbnail.

10. Q: How do I prevent an underline from appearing under a link?

A: That's covered in the Links chapter of our sister tutorial, CSS: An Interactive Tutorial for Beginners. It is a cascading style sheets style.

11. Q: How do I open a link into a new window?

A: This feature is a byproduct of frames (In many opinions, the only good things frames did for web design). On any HTML page, you can just add target="_blank" to your link syntax.
e.g. <a href="http://www.davesite.com/" target="_blank">davesite.com</a>

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